5th Annual Conference – Biomedical Treatment of Autism, PDD, ADD/HD, OCD and Tourette Syndrome


5th Annual Conference - Biomedical Treatment of Autism, PDD, ADD/HD, OCD and Tourette Syndrome
5th Annual Conference – Biomedical Treatment of Autism, PDD, ADD/HD, OCD and Tourette Syndrome

5th Annual Conference – Biomedical Treatment of Autism, PDD, ADD/HD, OCD and Tourette Syndrome. Register here.

You can find out more about biomedical treatments for autism here.


Autism – what is biomedical treatment for autism? A guest FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) from Dr Sonya Doherty!


Dr. Sonya Doherty
Dr. Sonya Doherty
We are delighted to reproduce the latest in our series of guest blog posts from Dr Sonya Doherty.

Today she offers and introduction to biomedical treatments for autism. As this is a new therapy for me I’m very interested in getting feedback on biomedical treatment for autism from our readers. Please feel free to share your experiences in the comments section below.

Doherty writes:-

“1. What is biomedical treatment?

Biomedical treatment is an individualized medical treatment program to prevent and treat developmental disorders like autism spectrum disorder, ADHD, OCD, Tourette Syndrome and Speech Language Delay (Apraxia, Dyspraxia).

2. What type childhood disorders can benefit from biomedical treatment?

Biomedical treatment focuses on identifying weaknesses in a child’s body that are obstacles to development. So, any child can benefit from this program because it is the most comprehensive medical treatment plan to optimize brain development. The children who experience the most dramatic changes in language, social, cognitive and behavioural development are the children who are diagnosed with autism. They are the children who need biomedical treatment the most.


3. What is the earliest age you see?

The youngest biomedical patients are those who have siblings diagnosed with autism. Our sibling program focuses on prevention of developmental delays. Children who have a sibling on the autism spectrum are 20% more likely to be diagnosed themselves. They experience higher levels of speech delay, sensory issues, attention and focus problems and behavioural issues. Siblings are more likely to have eczema, allergies, asthma, constipation and sleep issues.

We begin more intensive biomedical treatment at the first sign of significant developmental concerns such as eye contact or visual tracking problems in infants or sensory meltdowns and self-stimulating behaviour in toddlers.

4. Can you begin treatment without a diagnosis?

It is SO UNBELIEVABLY IMPORTANT to act right away. Early intervention increases the likelihood of recovering significant and peer level language, social and cognitive function. Unfortunately, the staggering length of the waitlist means that our little ones begin treatment long before they get a diagnosis and years before they will ever receive any funded treatment. The good news is that the younger kids begin biomedical treatment, the better the outcome.

5. What type of results can parents expect to see? and how quickly?

We expect to see positive changes in 4-12 weeks. Better eye contact, decreased sensory issues, increased attempts to communicate verbally and/or non-verbally. Biomedical treatment is about repair and recovery. This process takes time and to see the best results, the treatment plans should be adjusted and changed every few months as a child moves through different stages. In the beginning, it is essential to stop further damage to the brain. The second step is to repair and then after 1-3 years our patients are on maintenance programs to continue to support their development.

6. Is the cost covered by private insurance coverage?

Many people have private insurance and biomedical treatment visits are covered by naturopathic benefits. It is important to help parents plan a monthly budget for biomedical treatments like methyl B12 injections. There are also important laboratory assessments that are done in the beginning of treatment and re-assessed throughout the process. The average yearly cost is $2000-3000. For the majority of our patients, 1-3 years of biomedical treatment creates development gains that are life changing. Biomedical works by opening doors now, doors that may remain closed because of untreated medical issues.

7. How does a family get started?

Some families like to read books or look at current medical research in this area. For those parents, we encourage them to get our biomedical handbook to get more information or to look online at www.treatautism.ca.

Other parents are ready to get started and can begin the process by contacting our clinic.
Sonya Doherty
Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine, FMAPS (candidate)

“Head banging and autism: Why kids bang their heads and how biomedical treatment can help” A guest post by Dr. Sonya Doherty



Dr. Sonya Doherty
Dr. Sonya Doherty

Welcome to our latest guest post from Dr. Sonya Doherty. You can read the original post on her blog here.

Dr. Sonya Doherty is a licensed and board certified Naturopathic Doctor who is an active member of the CAND. Sonya Doherty completed her undergraduate training at the University of Western Ontario in a Bachelor of Science Honors Kinesiology program.

Dr. Sonya Doherty writes” Head banging is very common in children diagnosed with autism.  From a biomedical perspective, head banging is considered a sign or symptom of an underlying problem.  Something is triggering the need to head bang.  Children with autism have dysregulated brain chemicals (neurotransmitters) that impair their ability to process sensory information.  This sensory processing impairment causes pain.  Sometimes a child’s brain feels overwhelmed or scrambled.  Other times, the sensory input is causing direct pain to the brain.  The best example is if someone pops a balloon beside your ear.  You would be thrown into sensory overload because your auditory system was assaulted by an unexpected, loud sound.  For children with autism, the balance of brain chemicals change the way they perceive sensory information, dramatically increasing the effect of sensory stimuli on the brain.  For some children, this external assault on their brain is so overwhelming that they will bang their heads to drown out the information being picked up through their senses.  The world is a minefield for someone who cannot turn off background noise.  The typically developing brain can turn off unwanted sensory information.  The HVAC system that hums in your office is “tuned out”, protecting the brain from sensory overload.  In autism, there is no turning off these sounds. 



The fire truck down the street, the hum of traffic, 5 different conversations, typing on the keyboard etc.  Theses sounds all bombard the brain causing discomfort and pain.  Head banging is a survival strategy used to deal with this devastating amount of input.  Recent research has shown that people on the spectrum have more brain activity, even at rest.  I believe many “autistic behaviours” are an attempt to manage this overstimulation.  The head banging is a pain that children can control.  It creates pain, but distracts them from a far more distressing pain that is unrelenting and can’t be escaped.  Children withdraw from the world because of the inability to deal with this massive surplus of data.  Without the ability to interpret the data properly, head banging can help give some relief.

So, why is this happening?  Brain chemical imbalance can be related directly back to the methylation cycle.  When babies are conceived, they are not methylated.  Methylation is the process by which children develop in the womb and beyond.  Ninety percent of children with autism have methylation impairment, according to NIH funded research at the Arkansas Children’s Research Institute.  Methylation supports healthy neurons and brain chemicals.  This cycle is required to produce and regulate dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine and GABA.  Methylation helps protect the brain from toxins by producing glutathione.  Glutathione is the “battery” in the brain.  The brain can only develop as far as the glutathione levels will take it.  Toxins like PCBs, bisphenol A, lead and mercury have been directly linked to autism spectrum disorder and are removed from the body via glutathione.  As the “battery” runs down in the brain because of impairments in the methylation cycle and due to toxins, the brain begins to get excited.  The major protective mechanism in the brain relies on glutathione status.  Without glutathione, another brain chemical called glutamate builds up, causing excitability.  The excitability reaches a toxic level and becomes EXCITOTOXIC.  This state of excess glutatmate causes the sensory systems to crash and become overloaded.  Head banging, self-stimulating behaviour, aggression, irritability, hyperactivity and obsession with electronics can all be linked back to the lack of glutathione in the brain.Head banging is also linked to digestive issues in children with ASD.  Gut pain is the cause of many autistic behaviours.  Ninety percent of the body’s serotonin is produced in the digestive tract.  Constipation or diarrhea disrupts the production of serotonin which then negatively impacts the balance of dopamine.  Dopamine is one of the main brain chemicals that helps to properly process sensory information. When children have digestive problems, they are likely to also have yeast and bacterial imbalance.  These imbalances can worsen the state of EXCITOTOXICITY in the brain by depleted key nutrients and directly impairing the way the brain works through their impact on serotonin and dopamine.  The gut brain connection is extremely strong in autism.  Mounting research is linking the imbalance of good bacteria in the gut to ASD.  Good bacteria impact the way the brain functions.  We know that children with autism lack certain types of good bacteria.  When supplemented with the right strains, autistic behaviuors like head banging get better.

 

“Surveys published in the gastroenterology literature have stated that gastrointestinal problems, such as chronic constipation or diarrhea, occur in 46% to 85% of children with ASDs.”

Journal of Pediatrics – Scott M. Myers, MD

 

 What can you do to help your child who is banging their head?

First, if it hasn’t become crystal clear that your child is in pain, refer back to the above section.  THIS IS NOT A BEHAVIOUR.  Your child is in pain and now that you know, let’s get started on making them feel better.  Dr. Martha Herbert wrote a ground breaking book called The Autism Revolution.  In her book, she recommends a diet that will help your child.  The diet is hard.  And because your child is in pain, they likely are addicted to foods that give quick bursts of reprieve to the brain: Gluten, dairy, sugar and processed foods.  Your child’s diet, like their head banging, is a product of brain balance.  Helping to get rid of head banging and begin the process of repairing the brain is not easy but healing the brain is possible.  Healing means feeling better, learning easier, communicating more.  Sometimes is means children can progress over years of treatment off the spectrum.  Step one, though, is just to get them out of pain.

Here are the things your child can eat (it is only going to take one line):

– MEAT, VEGETABLES, FRUIT, NUTS AND SEEDS (as long as they are not allergic!!!!!)

Did I mention that Martha Herbert is a pediatric neurologist, associate professor at Harvard and one of the leading experts in the world on autism treatment?  I should mention that because here are the foods your child cannot eat (I am only going to need one line here as well)

– DAIRY, GRAINS (not just gluten – all grains), CORN, POTATO, MOST BEANS AND LEGUMES

The basic treatment guildelines in my practice have been fine tuned over the last 10 years of treating children with developmental concerns.  I have worked with over 2000 families to help prevent and treat developmental disorders such as autism, ADHD, dyspraxia / apraxia, speech delay, OCD, ODD and Tourette Syndrome.  The basic treatments include the above diet in addition to healing the digestive system, supporting the methylation cycle and saturating the brain with healthy fats.

Thanks for reading. ”

How do you know if you have OCD or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder? Watch this video to find out more!


Nearly half of people claim to have OCD related traits or behaviours, but how do you

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder OCD
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder OCD

know when it’s really OCD?

Log on to the  live web TV show to find out the symptoms of this mental illness, what it can lead to, what can be done to treat it and what the risks are of ignoring signs

Show date: Wednesday 13th November

Show time: 2pm

In recent years OCD or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder has been the subject of many TV documentaries, reality TV shows and even stand-up comedy routines. But how much do we actually know about the condition and are such shows part of the problem when it comes to lack of understanding?

Official estimates are that 1.2% of the population suffer from OCD, however new research released by benenden health reveals that more than 40% of people polled believe they exhibit traits of the mental illness, highlighting the real lack of awareness many people have.

From obsessive checking of things like making sure appliances are turned off and doors are locked, to compulsive hand washing, hoarding and pervasive thoughts that if everything isn’t in order bad things will happen, OCD can come in many different forms.

But how serious is the condition, what can it lead to from a mental health perspective and how easy is it to treat?

Log on to benenden heath’s live Web TV show where

Nearly half of people claim to have OCD related traits or behaviours, but how do you know when it’s really OCD?

Log on to the  live web TV show to find out the symptoms of this mental illness, what it can lead to, what can be done to treat it and what the risks are of ignoring signs

Show date: Wednesday 13th November

Show time: 2pm

In recent years OCD or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder has been the subject of many TV documentaries, reality TV shows and even stand-up comedy routines. But how much do we actually know about the condition and are such shows part of the problem when it comes to lack of understanding?

Official estimates are that 1.2% of the population suffer from OCD, however new research released by benenden health reveals that more than 40% of people polled believe they exhibit traits of the mental illness, highlighting the real lack of awareness many people have.

From obsessive checking of things like making sure appliances are turned off and doors are locked, to compulsive hand washing, hoarding and pervasive thoughts that if everything isn’t in order bad things will happen, OCD can come in many different forms.

But how serious is the condition, what can it lead to from a mental health perspective and how easy is it to treat?

Log on to benenden heath’s live Web TV show where Beth Murphy, Head of Information at Mind discusses OCD – from recognising the symptoms and traits of the condition, to treatment and the risks of ignoring the warning signs in both yourself and others.

To ask any questions for the show  please go to http://www.studiotalk.tv/show/could-you-or-someone-you-know-be-suffering-from-ocd

 


Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Awareness Week 2013 – submit for questions about OCD for WebTV show!

OCD Awareness Week
OCD Awareness Week

Log on to the  live web TV show on the first day of OCD Awareness Week to find out the symptoms of this mental illness, what it can lead to, what can be done to treat it and what the risks are of ignoring signs

Show date: Monday 14th October

Show time: 2pm

In recent years OCD or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder has been the subject of many TV documentaries, reality TV shows and even stand-up comedy routines. But how many of us could actually be suffering from some of the traits of the condition without even realising it?

Official estimates are that 1.2% of the population suffer from OCD, however new research released by Benenden Health and backed by charity OCD UK reveals the numbers could be much higher.

From obsessive checking of things like making sure appliances are turned off and doors are locked, to compulsive hand washing, hoarding and pervasive thoughts that if everything isn’t in order bad things will happen, OCD can come in many different forms.

But how serious is the condition, what can it lead to from a mental health perspective and how easy is it to treat?

Log on to Benenden Heath’s live Web TV show where Ashley Fulwood, Chief Executive of OCD UK and Dr Victoria Bream Oldfield, Clinical Psychologist (OCD Specialist) discuss OCD – from recognising the symptoms and traits of the condition, to treatment and the risks of ignoring the warning signs in both yourself and others.