Lifestyle Tips To Improve Circulation

Poor circulation is associated with a number of different medical conditions such as diabetes, obesity and Raynaud’s disease.

But plenty of us suffer from poor circulation so we thought we would share this useful infographic with a few useful lifestyle hits on how to improve your circulation.

 Lifestyle Tips To Improve Circulation (Infographic)
Presented By Therapy Stockings Compression Garments

Are you overfeeding your child?

Is your child eating too much?
Is your child eating too much?

Watch our video as we explore the potentially long term health implications of overfeeding your child, as new research shows the majority of toddlers are being offered much more food than they should be, with many regularly being given adult sized portions


A majority of parents are unwittingly giving their toddlers too much food, putting them at risk of obesity, according to new research from leading health and nutrition experts the Infant & Toddler Forum (ITF).

The survey of 1000 UK mums and dads revealed that 79% of parents routinely offer portions bigger than the recommended size range for pre-schoolers when serving popular meals, such as spaghetti bolognaise, drinks and treats.

The survey involved parents looking at images of portion sizes and revealed that over one in ten parents usually serve their child close to an adult-size portion of spaghetti bolognaise or cheese sandwiches.

In response to the survey findings the ITF, supported by 4Children, Family Lives and the Pre-school Learning Alliance, is launching the #rethinktoddlerportionsizes campaign. The campaign aims to encourage all families to rethink how much is on the plates of their young children, and is calling for guidance on appropriate portion sizes for families of young children to be a key public health strategy in the fight against obesity.

So just how much should you be feeding your child and should there be more specific guidelines to help parents figure out how much is too much?

Watch our video where we ask mums their thoughts on the issue as well as hearing expert advice from paediatric dietitian, Judy More and child and clinical psychologist, Gill Harris.

Healthy Diets
Healthy Diets




Do you support the idea of a “soda tax” to promote health and wellness? Please take our poll!

Do we need a soda tax to fight obesity?
Do we need a soda tax to fight obesity?

As some of our readers know Philadelphia has plans bring in the so-called “soda tax” to help “fight obesity”.

In simple terms the soda tax means that those who are distributing fizzy/soft/sugary drinks will have to pay a tax or around 50c per liter. They can choose if they pass it on to their customers or not. But I think it is safe to assume they will charge their clients a bit more.

However when prices go up consumption , it is thought, will go down. This, it is hoped, will help lower rates of obesity especially among younger people?

But is this true or is it the nanny state gone mad? Is government intervention the best way of promoting good health and wellness?

Please share your views in the poll below.

It would be great if you could share in a bit more detail your views in the comments section below.

Many thanks in advance for your help.





Weight loss – dieting for a year show weight loss can be maintained!

CWP 2016 choc shake and sachet port RGBExperts have welcomed newly published research that shows how weight loss can be maintained, without dieters inevitably regaining their original weight, by dieting for a year.

They say the breakthrough study by the University of Copenhagen into hormonal adaptions to weight loss sheds light on how weight loss with formula diets may help address the UK’s escalating diabetes and obesity problem, by showing it takes 12 months of dieting before the body’s chemicals change and a new weight can be permanently maintained.

The study showed that healthy, but obese, people put on a Cambridge Weight Plan 810 calorie formula diet for eight weeks lost 13 percent of their weight and kept the weight off after a 52 week maintenance formula diet.

The study looked at hormonal changes associated with effective long-term weight loss and feelings of fullness and allowed researchers new insights into the complex processes involved in obesity and especially weight loss in obesity.

Researchers in Denmark have found that obese people who had shed an eighth of their weight on an intensive diet and then kept it off for a year saw dramatic changes in the chemicals governing their appetites.

Professor Leeds, medical director of Cambridge Weight Plan said: “This shows for the first time that if enough weight is lost and kept off for long enough then the body seems to adjust to the lower weight and does not fight to try to regain it.

“This has very important implications for considering the use of formula diet programmes in community settings and GP practices as a way to combat obesity.”

“Since we now have good evidence that people can lose about ten percent of their body weight, usually about one and a half stone, and maintain that, it helps to have evidence that explains how weight loss is maintained.”

“Weight maintenance can be achieved by a permanent change in diet and eating behaviour and by physical activity, but not everyone can do this using conventional diet and keep the weight off, so this study reinforces the value of formula diets.”

Shake-Chocolate Mint-NEWAssociate Professor Signe Sørensen Torekov from the Department of Biomedical Sciences and Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, said: “The interesting and uplifting news in this study is that if you are able to maintain your weight loss for a longer period of time, it seems as if you have ‘passed the critical point’, and after this point, it will actually become easier for you to maintain your weight loss than it was immediately after the initial weight loss.

“Thus, the body is no longer fighting against you, but actually with you, which is good news for anyone trying to lose weight.

“We were able to show that you shouldn’t give up. If you’re able to keep your weight down for a year, then it shifts and becomes easier.”

“Other clinical trials are addressing the question of whether a ten percent weight loss with a total diet replacement of formula foods for eight weeks can prevent diabetes if followed by an effective weight loss strategy,” continued Professor Leeds.

“This new paper from Copenhagen encourages us to believe that we’re on the right path, when Britain is facing the risk of another million people with diabetes in 20 years’ time. Losing enough weight is known to be the key component of diabetes prevention programmes, an essential requirement for early diabetes reversal and for improving more advanced diabetes.”

Professor Gary Frost, who studies how people with diabetes can successfully lose weight at Imperial College London also welcomed the study: “Getting the right amount of weight loss to reverse early diabetes or improve more advanced diabetes is important. Just a few pounds won’t do. The right amount of change can be delivered initially with formula diet, followed by carefully managed re-introduction of conventional foods.

“I am convinced that when doctors and dietitians become familiar with how to help people through these impressive weight losses this will become a standard option within health care services on a global scale.”

Background:

The study findings were recently published in the European Journal of Endocrinology.

The main finding in the study revealed that after one year of successful weight loss maintenance, the researchers were able to demonstrate that postprandial levels of two appetite inhibiting hormones (GLP-1 and PYY) increased (=appetite inhibition) from before-weight loss level – in contrast to the hunger hormone ghrelin, which increased immediately after weight loss but returned to normal levels (= low hunger) after one year. This demonstrates that the hormones GLP-1 and PYY are able to adjust to a new ‘set point’ and thus may facilitate the continuation of a new and lower body weight.

“We know that obese people have low levels of the appetite inhibiting hormone GLP-1. The good thing is that now we are able to show that you can actually increase the levels of this hormone as well as the appetite inhibiting hormone PYY by weight loss and that the levels are kept high (=increased appetite inhibition) when you maintain your weight loss for a year,” adds first author of the study MD and PhD student Eva Winning Iepsen

Cambridge Weight Plan is an evidence-based formula diet programme that delivers safe weight loss and maintenance at greater rates than occurs after conventional diet. Gold-standard clinical trials have shown weight loss and maintenance of about 10kg (10 per cent) of body weight for four years in elderly obese people with knee osteoarthritis with reduced pain and improved cardiovascular profiles maintained for at least one year. Similar findings have been shown in men with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnoea, in women following heart attack and in people with psoriasis. Studies to demonstrate prevention of diabetes and reversal of early diabetes are underway. A recent presentation in Britain showed that a weight loss of 10kg in those with obesity and insulin treated type 2 diabetes can improve blood glucose control and reduce insulin dose. Four out of 10 participants were able to stop taking insulin.




What are superfoods? This is eye opening

What are superfoods?

We examine the evidence behind the health claims of 10 of the most popular so-called superfoods.

So-called, because there is no official definition of a “superfood” and the EU has banned health claims on packaging unless supported by scientific evidence.

But that hasn’t stopped many food brands from funding academics to research the health benefits of their product.

The superfood trend exploits the fact that healthy lifestyle choices, including diet, can reduce our risk of chronic diseases like heart disease, stroke and cancer.

The food industry wants to persuade us that eating some foods can slow down the ageing process, lift depression, boost our physical ability, and even our intelligence.

Many of us want to believe that eating a single fruit or vegetable containing a certain antioxidant will zap a diseased cell.

The problem is that most research on superfoods tests chemicals and extracts in concentrations not found in the food in its natural state.

Garlic, for example, contains a nutrient alleged to help reduce cholesterol and blood pressure. But you’d have to eat up to 28 cloves a day to match the doses used in the lab – something no researcher has yet been brave enough to try.


Foods that have been elevated to superfood status in recent years include those rich in antioxidants (such as beta-carotene, vitamins A, C, E, flavanoids and selenium) and omega-3 fatty acids.

Antioxidants are chemicals thought to protect against the harmful effects of free radicals, which are chemicals naturally produced in every living cell and known to cause cell damage.

However, evidence about this and other health benefits of antioxidants is inconclusive. In a review of the scientific evidence in 2011 (PDF, 188kb), the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) found no evidence that the antioxidant action on free radicals observed in the lab was of any benefit to human health.

On the other hand, some research suggests that certain antioxidant supplements may be harmful (PDF, 2.72Mb).

While the concept of a “miracle food” remains a fantasy, it’s pretty well-established that obesity and alcohol are the two most common causes of major long-term illness and increased risk of premature death.

Importance of a balanced diet

Diet plays an important role in our health, but there is concern that too much focus on individual foods may encourage unhealthy eating.

“No food, including those labelled ‘superfoods’, can compensate for unhealthy eating,” explains Alison Hornby, a dietitian and spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association (BDA).

“If people mistakenly believe they can ‘undo’ the damage caused by unhealthy foods by eating a superfood, they may continue making routine choices that are unhealthy and increase their risk of long-term illness.”

Dietitians avoid the term “superfood” and prefer to talk of “super diets”, where the emphasis is on a healthy, balanced diet, rich in fruit and vegetables and wholegrain foods.

There is good evidence that the Mediterranean diet can reduce the risk of some chronic diseases and increase life expectancy.

This diet includes plenty of fruit and vegetables, olive oil and legumes, and less meat and dairy foods than the typical Western diet.

Hornby says: “When it comes to keeping healthy, it’s best not to concentrate on any one food in the hope it will work miracles.

“All unprocessed food from the major food groups could be considered ‘super’. All these foods are useful as part of a balanced diet.

“You should eat a variety of foods, as described by the eatwell plate, to ensure you get enough of the nutrients your body needs. Focusing on getting your five portions of fruit and vegetables a day is a perfect way to start.”

We’ve teamed up with the BDA to look at the best available research to see if the health claims of 10 popular “superfoods” add up. Click on the foods listed below to see the evidence: