Behold wobbly dieters – Charlotte Crosby on staying fit

Charlotte Crosby dresses as an Angel and Devil as research by Hartley’s 10 Cal Jelly Pots finds that women have more willpower than men, with 3m men giving up New Year diets on 5th January, compared to women who are most likely to wobble on the 14th January. Hartley’s 10 Cal Jelly Pots contain just 10 calories each and are a great way to satisfy a sweet craving.
Charlotte Crosby dresses as an Angel and Devil as research by Hartley’s 10
Cal Jelly Pots finds that women have more willpower than men, with 3m men
giving up New Year diets on 5th January, compared to women who are most
likely to wobble on the 14th January. Hartley’s 10 Cal Jelly Pots contain
just 10 calories each and are a great way to satisfy a sweet craving.

3.26m Brits are set to ‘wobble’ from their diets on the 14th January; how can we prevent the apocalypse of the New Year health and fitness goals?

Whopping 26m Brits start a diet as a New Year’s resolution with 87% of them breaking the resolution

92% of Brits say they will break their New Year diet within one month

‘New year, new you’ is not always a happy ending with so many of us falling off the wagon within the first few days and months of starting a new diet as a New Year’s resolution.

Eight out of ten Brits are estimated to wobble from their New Year diet on the 14th January with 7-8pm marked as the time of the diet apocalypse. Cravings (52%) top the list of triggers making us fall behind our diet goals followed by boredom (37.5%) and stress (29.2%).

So what do most of the dieters crave for? 52 per cent crave for chocolate followed by crisps (34%), take-away (27%), cheese (26%) and alcoholic drinks (25%).

Research by Hartley’s 10 Cal Jelly Pots has revealed interesting gender, age and regional variances in how diets crumble to snacks and sweets’ galore. Between men and women, the former are most likely to wobble from their New Year diet on the 5th January in 2017 before the Christmas decorations have even come down. In comparison, women have more willpower with 14th January marked as the end of their new diets.

Regionally, 21 per cent of people living in Southampton and 19 per cent in Birmingham won’t break their diets in 2017 making them the most dedicated dieters in the UK. Those from Norwich, Glasgow and Cardiff are most likely to wobble. Young teens and 35+ people are considered to be fairly better than 25-to-34 year olds who are most likely to break their diet.

Joining us today is TV star Charlotte Crosby with her top tips for staying fit in 2017. Crosby has two best-selling fitness DVDs and pledges to prevent the nation from a diet wobble this January!

*Source: Censuswide of 2,010 respondents, conducted by Hartley’s 10 Cal Jelly Pots.

Top five UK regions that are most likely to give up on their diets this January:
 Norwich (95.7%)
 Glasgow (94.4%)
 Cardiff (93.1%)
 Belfast (93.1%)
 London (90.7%)

Top five UK regions that are most likely to stick to their diets this January:
 Southampton (21%)
 Birmingham (18.8%)
 Leeds (18.2%)
 Brighton (17.9%)
 Bristol, Plymouth and Sheffield (16.7%)

Calling the cancer community – New study, harnessing ground-breaking science, offers hope to mesothelioma patients.


  • Study will evaluate a new drug that suppresses cancer stem cells, a ground-breaking new
    Mesothelioma and cancer research
    Mesothelioma and cancer research

    science, as potential new treatment for pleural mesothelioma; an aggressive cancer that affects the lining of the lungs, and is strongly linked to asbestos exposure

  • In the UK, the number of deaths caused by the disease each year is growing and according to latest figures it is the most rapidly increasing cancer amongst women in the UK (3rd most for men)[i],[ii]
  • Despite the UK’s control on asbestos in 1985, the number of mesothelioma patients is set to rise sharply over the coming years as mesothelioma can take between 30-40 years from exposure to asbestos to develop[iii]
  • Mesothelioma is a highly aggressive disease, and even on currently approved treatment, the average survival time is only 12 months[iv]
  • There is no cure; the only approved chemotherapy regimen prolonged life by 2.8 months from 9.1 to 11.9 months[v]
  • Most at risk include builders, construction workers, railway workers, plumbers and gas fitters, dock workers,  electricians, roofers, painters and decorators and other tradespeople, along with their spouses[vi]
  • Lord Saatchi will be presenting his medical innovation bill at a public consultation on Monday 24th at the House of Lords. The bill is designed to enable doctors to innovate new treatments and cures for cancer and other diseases.
  • Should the bill be passed, its aim is to facilitate patients access to innovative treatments and clinical trials , like this one in cancer stem cell suppression.
  • On the International Rare Diseases Day , Friday (28th February). We want to focus the spotlight on the new developments in treatment options for patients fighting mesothelioma . Shifting the attention from the litigation around asbestos to raising awareness of the ongoing and continued research required for this disease.

Pleural mesothelioma, is an aggressive form of lung cancer strongly linked to asbestos exposure, which has very limited treatment options and is associated with poor patient survival, with most having less than a year left to live once diagnosed.iv

Eight leading UK cancer research centres are participating in a ground-breaking new study to evaluate a potential new treatment targeting cancer stem cells, and measure if the life expectancy of these patients could be prolonged. Cancer stem cells are often resistant to conventional chemotherapy, By targeting the cancer stem cells, it is hoped that the growth of the mesothelioma can be slowed or stopped, and a new treatment option for patients could be established. (Trials are taking place at Leicester Royal Infirmary, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford, Kings College, London and St. Batholomew’s Hospital, London, Wythenshaw Hospital, Manchester and Southampton General Hospital.)

Despite the UK’s control on asbestos in 1985, the number of mesothelioma patients is set to continue to rise sharply as mesothelioma can take between 30-40 years from exposure to asbestos to develop. In the UK, the number of deaths caused by the disease each year has grown to 2,543 in 2010 and it is the most rapidly increasing cancer amongst women in the UK (3rd most for men)[vii],ii

It is estimated that more than 9 out of 10 men and more than 8 out of 10 women with mesothelioma have been in contact with asbestos.vii,[viii]

Most at risk of developing the disease include builders, construction workers, railway workers, plumbers and gas fitters, dock workers, electricians, roofers, painters and decorators amongst other tradespeople and workers who have had exposure to asbestos.vi As the data on the increasing incidence in women show, the demographics are changing as asbestos is found in many places and secondary exposure is considered to be a great risk moving forward.

 

For patients who are diagnosed with mesothelioma, there are very limited treatment options beyond the one chemotherapy approved. By targeting cancer stems cells it is hoped that it will be possible to prolong patient survival and improve quality of life.



[ii] GLOBAL PANORAMA ON MESOTHELIOMA 2009. Laurie Kazan-Allen. Presented at Mesothelioma Symposium Chamber of Deputies. São Paulo, Brazil, November 2009

[iii] Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Mesothelioma in Great Britain 2013. http://www.hse.gov.uk/STATISTICS/causdis/mesothelioma/mesothelioma.pdf

[iv] Cancer Research UK. Statistics and Outlook: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-help/type/mesothelioma/treatment/statistics-and-outlook-for-mesothelioma#gen Accessed 08 November 2013

[v] Vogelsang, NJ et al., Phase III study of pemetrexed in combination with cisplatin versus cisplatin alone in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. J Clin Oncol. 2003 Jul 15;21(14):2636-44.

[vi]http://www.mesothelioma.uk.com/editorimages/Factsheets/Concerned%20about%20Asbestos%20Exposure%20June%202010%20downloadable.pdf

[vii] Cancer Research UK. Mesothelioma Risks and Causes. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-help/type/mesothelioma/about/mesothelioma-risks-and-causes#how   Accessed 27 November 2013

[viii] The Asbestos Center: http://www.asbestos.com/mesothelioma/uk/  Accessed 27 November 2013

 


(An estimated 350-400patients from eleven countries worldwide will participate in the study. In the UK, participants are currently being recruited at eight research centres:

  • Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester
  • Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge
  • Velindre Hospital, Cardiff
  • Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford
  • King’s College, London
  • St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, London
  • Wythenshaw Hospital, Manchester
  • Southampton General Hospital, Southampton

About Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

Malignant pleural mesothelioma is an aggressive form of cancer that occurs in the mesothelium, the thin layer of tissue that covers the lungs. Since the 1960s, it has been known that the disease can be triggered by the inhalation of asbestos fibres; an insulating material which was used widely in the building and manufacturing industries up until 1985 when the UK issued a ban on asbestos.vii It is estimated that in the UK more than 9 out of 10 men and more than 8 out of 10 women with mesothelioma have been in contact with asbestos and the number of deaths caused by the disease each year has grown to 2,543 in 2010 and is one of the highest increasing rates of incidence in the world.vii,viii This number is set to continue to rise sharply over the next 20 years, with a peak coming in 2020.vii According to the World Health Organization, a total of 59,000 deaths occur worldwide each year due to mesothelioma. Most mesotheliomas begin as one or more nodules that progressively grow to form a solid coating of tumour surrounding the lung leading to eventual suffocation and death. A high percentage of mesotheliomas contain cancer stem cells which are generally resistant to the currently available treatment options for advanced mesothelioma.

 

Most at risk professions:

  • Carpenters and joiners
  • Boiler, pipe and heating workers
  • Shipbuilding/shipyard workers
  • Navy seamen
  • Dockworkers
  • Laggers and sprayers
  • Mechanics
  • Plumbers and gasfitters
  • Roofers
  • Construction and demolition workers
  • Painters and decorators
  • Electricians
  • Railway workers and coach construction
  • Engineers
  • Power station workers
  • Laboratory and research
  • Asbestos manufacture and sales
  • And the spouses of the at risk professions ( from exposure to their work wear when washing the clothing)

WEBLINKS                  

www.mesothelioma.uk.com

www.cancerresearchuk.org