What to do if you face workplace bullying – an important Web TV show for people with conditions like autism or multiple sclerosis


Anti-Bullying Week 2014
Anti-Bullying Week 2014
Have you ever experienced bullying in the workplace and would speaking out about it mean jeopardizing your job or future career prospects?

Recent research reveals that a staggering amount of people have been bullied in the workplace with a further frightening amount of people admitting to witnessing others being bullied.

Joining us in this special live and interactive show is former Head of the Anti-Bullying Alliance, Luke Roberts, employment lawyer Paula Chan, from Slater and Gordon where they’ll be discussing the best way to handle workplace bullying.

Our experts will be covering an array of topics and giving helpful advice especially with; how to spot the warning signs of being bullied, being bullied by a colleague to more frighteningly from your boss or management and whether speaking out can put your employment at risk.

They will discuss some of the most the most common forms of bullying such as rudeness, bitchy/gossiping behavior, intimidation, humiliation in front of colleagues, shouting and other forms of bullying that is taken in the form of racial discrimination or unfair treatment during pregnancy. Women confessed to having lost their jobs after announcing their pregnancy to their company or been subjected to bullied to the point of resignation. We discuss the best way to keep job security high in this instance.
Watch our show for more information on bullying, what to do and the best ways to cope.


Autism and Bullying 2.”MISSION: BULLY-PROOFING MYSELF” – a free example lesson on dealing with bullying!


Autism and Challenging Behavior
Autism and Challenging Behavior
As many of you will have noticed we have been showing our support for anti-bullying campaigns over the last few years.

Do our friends at The ORP Library have asked us to share one4 of their example anti-bullying lessons with you.

 

So check out this free lesson from the workshop guidebook, Those Who Bully and Those Who Are Bullied.

In this lesson, children can:

  • figure out different ways to bully-proof themselves,
  • learn how to create a plan of action for when bullying happens,
  • and parents can use this as a tool to help with communication on bullying.



LESSON 11 – MISSION: BULLY-PROOFING MYSELF

Bullying happens sometimes, but that doesn’t mean you can’t help bully-proof yourself. What does that mean?

Bully-proofing yourself means building your skills, courage, and confidence to handle
bullying if it happens. It also helps you send the message to others that you are not an easy target.

KEYS TO BULLY-PROOFING YOURSELF
• Talk to an adult you trust: Agree on a plan of action if you are bullied or witness someone else being bullied. This way you know that you have support and have an idea of how to handle a situation if you are faced with it.

• Don’t believe a word they say: “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me” is a popular saying that isn’t necessarily true. Words can and do hurt, but if you know that nothing bullies say about you is true and it’s more about their state of mind, it’s easier to ignore them and not believe what they are saying to you. No matter what they say, you are a valuable and strong person. Don’t believe them.

• Assert yourself: Practice and remember some things you could say in return if someone is bullying you. Example: I know that I’m not stupid. I want you to leave me alone.

• Stay calm: Those who are bullying often pick on people they know will react emotionally. They feel more power and control because they caused that reaction. Instead, just remain calm. Ignore them. Walk away. Don’t give them the satisfaction.

• Basic avoidance: Students who bully often strike when adults are not present. Avoid unsupervised areas like empty hallways, bathrooms away from the main hall, or certain areas of the playground that are out of the line of sight of a teacher or other adult.
• Fake it: Even if you aren’t feeling brave and strong, act like you are. It is important that the person bullying you thinks that you are.
• Build yourself up: Know that you are important, you are cared for, and you matter!
• Use imagery: Imagine situations where you are assertive and the situation ends well.

ACTIVITY
Knowing how to bully-proof yourself is important, but you will still face challenges. Come up with a plan of action to help you navigate your way through those challenges. Post this list somewhere so that you can refer back to it anytime you need to!
1. An adult I can trust to talk to when faced with a bullying challenge:

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
2. If someone says something to me that I know is not true, I will:

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
3. Something I can say in return to a mean comment to be assertive and let others know that I am not an easy target is:

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4. Ways to remain calm when faced by a bullying challenge are:

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

5. Ways to avoid being in a bullying situation are:

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
6. When I’m feeling weak and afraid inside but want to appear to be brave and strong on the outside, I will:

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
7. One thing I will tell myself everyday to remind me that I am valuable and important is:

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Home-school communication for children with autism and other special needs. Read our guest post from Jessica Brundle of Sponsored School Planners


Sponsored school planners for students with autism
Sponsored school planners for students with autism

Welcome to the latest in our series of guest posts regarding autism and education.  Today Jessica Brundle of Sponsored School Planners tells us a bit more about their innovative way of improving home-school communication aimed at children with autism and other special needs.  Brundle also invites you to take part in short survey to help them make the product better.

Ms Brundle shares “Parents, what are they thinking about schools? We did the research, and then took it upon ourselves to provide a tool to help boost an improvement in home-school communication. With our tailor-made, informative planners here’s what we addressed and we put it all in one place, because we care. The planners are to be issued each September.

Communication

As parents we set out to improve home-school communication. We believe it’s a crucial element to monitor a child’s progression, and wanted to be able to monitor our own children’s education and developments. We are now on a mission to help all other parents and schools too. After speaking with Oftsed we were advised that on inspection improvement in home-school communication is well regarded, we’re invited to the school site to show and explain to Ofsted how each school utilises them, each planner is tailor-made for each school, and absolutely free, with no cost to the school. We fund the planners by seeking business sponsorship; we then allow ethical businesses relating to children’s services, such as swimming clubs, dance schools, football clubs, tutors, driving instructors and party entertainers etc. to offer a discount to The School Group (parents, pupils and teachers). We are essentially giving as much as possible to different aspects of the community. We believe it’s time to pull together and are absolutely passionate about working to help others.

We believe monitoring a child’s progress both academically and socially are just as crucial as each other. Academics are an important aspect of a child’s education and lessons are important, we also believe social skills are just as important to better the next generation so they can have a positive, ethical input in the community during their childhood and adult lives.

It’s crucial to install good ethics from a young age so we provide planners to children aged between 4-16 years.

Why?

We are absolutely passionate about the four following fundamentals in creating our next generation, we are parents who genuinely care and have the children best interests at heart, we want to make a difference.

  1. Anti-bullying, we have free information in the planners regarding anti-bullying, we need to raise a respectful generation, not a bunch of bullies, we need to accept everyone, and so do our children, we tackle bullying head on in our planners. We will also speak in school assemblies to promote and explain what’s in the planners and why, we fund this through our charity “Bully Off”. All schools have golden rules; our favourite golden rule is “Keeping everyone included”.
  2. Internet Safety, safeguarding our children against chat rooms etc.
  3. Healthy eating, balanced diets, types of foods, and discounts on healthy options.
  4. Tips for parents in connection to how children are being taught at school. Parents were taught in a different time, how are they supposed to know how the children are being taught, how are they supposed to help with homework? The planner gives welcomed tips.

Going to school is important for learning to interact with other people. Learning social skills is just as important as learning history, math, science, and English. Accepting others for who they are and seeing the good in others, realising we are all different, realising that no matter what we can all help each other, now that is what we like to call an education. That way you can learn the fundamental elements before getting into real world situations to better prepare you.

Testimonial, Headteacher, Mrs Rachel Hall of Newton Hill Community School “We can’t thank you enough for what you are doing, you are really bringing the community together and the planners are great, we can’t wait to use them come September, thank you so much, I like the fact they are tailor-made and not box-standard off the shelf, they really are unique”.

The planners are a fabulous tool for parents of children with special needs to monitor their child on a day-to-day basis. Here’s what some of our parents had to say already using planners:

Rebekah Finney-Edwards “All I can say is it’s a blessing people are out there like yourselves because these kiddies would get lost amongst the system without you. Good luck and I hope they work for many young children because it’s a life-long skill they are being taught and if they can be taught to write down and plan things early they will have a fab skill to carry them through life”.


Helen Greenhough “Oliver is at an autistic school in Castleford and he has a diary which I and his teacher write in daily. It’s great because I know what he’s done at school every day and I can pass on if he’s had a difficult night etc”.

Jo Foster “I work in a special School in Cannock and we have them for all pupils, differentiated for individual needs. They are a very important and effective means of communication”.

Jackie Reeves “When my son was in primary (he is 20 now), the school didn’t have planners but me and his teacher thought it would be a good idea so she made him one”

Jackie Reeves “The letters thing ‘ah I remember it well!’ Missed special assemblies and didn’t send money in on time for trips all too often because of missing letters … until he got the planner!”

Caroline Jones “They are really helpful tells us what kind of day he’s had and his different activities he’s done in the day. They are a great way for me to let them know if he’s not slept well and so on.  A lot affects his mood and behavior, brilliant idea”.  ”

Here’s a link to a short survey, it would be good to receive more comments regarding the project.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/D2RHN38

You can contact Sponsored School Planners below

www.sponsoredschoolplanners.co.uk

Twitter: @SponsoredP

Facebook: Sponsored School Planners