Does use of devices such as computers, tablets or smartphones have a deleterious on our eyesight?

These days many of us use laptops, iPhones or one of a myriad of screen based communication devices.

The revolution the introduction of this technology has in some countries changed healthcare for the better. You can read some of the ways this has happened here.

But is there a downside?

This infographic suggests there could be a major impact on our eyesight from screens? Do you agree? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below.

The Screen Generation: Are We All Going Blind?
Via: WhatisDryEye.com

Do you know what are the risks to your eye health? Find out about blue light and UV rays

New research reveals most Britons unaware of damage to their eyes by surrounding objects, activities, and devices.

Anatomy of the human eye
Anatomy of the human eye

The poll has shown that many British people remain uninformed about the various ways in which eyes are damaged by common daily factors, despite evidence that eye health is affected by blue light[i], UV rays (reflected from common surfaces)[ii], diet[iii], obesity[iv], and smoking[v].

Of the 2,096 people polled, the percentage of respondents aware of the link between known factors affecting and eye health were:

  • Poor diet (59%)
  • Obesity (35%)
  • Smoking tobacco (36%)
  • UV light, not just direct from the sun but reflected off shiny surfaces (54%)
  • Blue light from low energy lightbulbs and electronic screens (29%)

Over one in ten people were completely unaware that any of these factors could affect your eyesight at all.

72% of respondents own or wear prescription glasses but only 28% knew that there were lenses available (for both prescription and non-prescription glasses) to protect against some of these factors. Namely ‘blue light’ (emitted from electronic devices and low energy light bulbs), and ‘UV light’ (not only directly from the sun but also from reflections such as off of water, windows, and road surfaces).


76% admitted they haven’t heard of E-SPF ratings – the grade given to lenses to show the level of protection they offer against UV.

Just 13% have lenses with protection from direct and reflected UV light, and only 2% have protection from blue light (from screens, devices, and low energy bulbs).

Poll results showed that younger people were most aware of the dangers of UV and blue light, yet least aware of how smoking tobacco and obesity can affect your eye health. W

Awareness of the impacts of smoking and obesity on eye health is significantly higher in Scotland (47% & 49% respectively) than anywhere else in the UK (35% & 33% in England and 40% & 38% in Wales).

Essilor’s Professional Relations Manager, Andy Hepworth, has commented: “The lack of awareness about these common risks to people’s eyes is concerning. Not only would many more glasses wearers be better protected, but also many people who do not wear glasses would likely take precautions too, if made aware of the dangers and the existence of non-prescription protective lenses”

To see the full results of the poll, please visit the Essilor site here: http://www.essilor.co.uk/all_about_vision/all_about_vision_news_events/Eye_Health_At_Risk

For more information on the protection offered from blue light and UV through specialist lens coatings, for both prescriptions and non-prescription glasses, please see here for Essilor UV & Blue Light Protection.

 

*All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc.  Total sample size was 2,096 adults. Fieldwork was undertaken between 21st and 24th August 2015.  The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all GB adults (aged 18+).

[i] Blue light causes a chemical to be produced that brings on cell death in the eye. Over time this can lead to age related muscular degeneration (AMD). – Aging of Cultured Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells: Oxidative Reactions, Lipofuscin Formation and Blue Light Damage – Documenta Ophthalmologica. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1022419606629

 

[ii] Prolonged exposure to UV rays can bring about early-onset cataracts and premature ocular aging. – Effect of Ultraviolet Radiation on Cataract Formation – The New England Journal of Medicine. http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJM198812013192201
Reflected UV rays are arguably more important than direct rays, as they are responsible for 50% of the UV radiation we receive, yet it is not as immediately obvious to the public that this is a concern. – Meyler J and Schnider C. The role of UV-blocking soft CLs in ocular protection. Optician 2002, 223: 5854: 28-32.

 

[iii] A good diet rich in carotenoids from foods such as broccoli, green beans, leafy greens, foods with vitamins C and E, foods with omega-3 fatty acids and foods with zinc can help prevent macular degeneration. – Dietary Antioxidants and the Long-term Incidence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Blue Mountains Eye Study – Ophthalmology. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0161642007004745 and Dietary Carotenoids, Vitamins A, C, and E, and Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration – The Journal of the American Medical Association. http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=382145

 

[iv] Obesity puts pressure on to blood vessels, which are especially delicate in your eyes, and this causes damage that can lead to poor vision. Obesity is also related to poor nutrition, which can prevent your eyes from getting the vitamins they need to maintain good health. – Obesity, Lutein Metabolism, and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: a Web of Connections – Nutrition Reviews – Oxford Journals. http://nutritionreviews.oxfordjournals.org/content/63/1/9

 

[1] Blue light causes a chemical to be produced that brings on cell death in the eye. Over time this can lead to age related muscular degeneration (AMD). – Aging of Cultured Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells: Oxidative Reactions, Lipofuscin Formation and Blue Light Damage – Documenta Ophthalmologica. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1022419606629

 

[1] Prolonged exposure to UV rays can bring about early-onset cataracts and premature ocular aging. – Effect of Ultraviolet Radiation on Cataract Formation – The New England Journal of Medicine. http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJM198812013192201
Reflected UV rays are arguably more important than direct rays, as they are responsible for 50% of the UV radiation we receive, yet it is not as immediately obvious to the public that this is a concern. – Meyler J and Schnider C. The role of UV-blocking soft CLs in ocular protection. Optician 2002, 223: 5854: 28-32.

 

[1] A good diet rich in carotenoids from foods such as broccoli, green beans, leafy greens, foods with vitamins C and E, foods with omega-3 fatty acids and foods with zinc can help prevent macular degeneration. – Dietary Antioxidants and the Long-term Incidence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Blue Mountains Eye Study – Ophthalmology. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0161642007004745 and Dietary Carotenoids, Vitamins A, C, and E, and Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration – The Journal of the American Medical Association. http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=382145

 

[1] Obesity puts pressure on to blood vessels, which are especially delicate in your eyes, and this causes damage that can lead to poor vision. Obesity is also related to poor nutrition, which can prevent your eyes from getting the vitamins they need to maintain good health. – Obesity, Lutein Metabolism, and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: a Web of Connections – Nutrition Reviews – Oxford Journals. http://nutritionreviews.oxfordjournals.org/content/63/1/9

 

[1] Smoking amplifies the impact of oxidation on cells in the eye, as well as restricting blood flow and causing build-up of heavy metals in the eye. – Smoking And Neovascular Form Of Age Related Macular Degeneration In Late Middle Aged Males: Findings From A Case-Control Study In Japan – British Journal of Ophthalmology. http://bjo.bmj.com/content/81/10/901.full

 

[v] Smoking amplifies the impact of oxidation on cells in the eye, as well as restricting blood flow and causing build-up of heavy metals in the eye. – Smoking And Neovascular Form Of Age Related Macular Degeneration In Late Middle Aged Males: Findings From A Case-Control Study In Japan – British Journal of Ophthalmology. http://bjo.bmj.com/content/81/10/901.full

 

Are you seeing things clearly?- submit for questions here for next weeks show on eye health and how to spot possible eye problems


Khalid Ikram
Khalid Ikram

Log on to our live and interactive web TV show where Consultant Ophthalmic and Refractive Surgeon Khalid Ikram talks about some common eye health myths and gives advice on how to look after your eye health and spot potential problems

It’s something many of us take for granted, but good eye health is by no means guaranteed and while age is a key factor in the deterioration of our eyesight and the health of our eyes, there are many more factors that can contribute.

According to a survey conducted by Spectrum Thea 94% of Optometrists don’t think as a nation we take our eye health seriously or take care of our eyes as much as we should.

Our reliance on computers and digital devices as well as things like diet, alcohol consumption and smoking can all have an impact.

And if, like millions of Brits, you’re not getting your eyes tested regularly, then you may not even be aware that you have a problem.

To help spot the signs log on to our live and interactive web TV show where Khalid Ikram discusses some common eye myths, demonstrates exercises to help your vision and answers all your questions on how to keep your eyes healthy.

Click here to submit questions before the show

Khalid Ikram, Consultant Ophthalmic and Refractive Surgeon and Janet Peacock joins us live online at

 

on Monday 22nd September at 1pm


Do you have UV protection in your glasses? Check out this post to find out why you need it!


UV radiation protection in glasses
UV radiation protection in glasses
Of course, the effects of Ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure to skin are now widely known, however the risks of UV exposure to eyesight are not as well known, with research suggesting just 10% of the respondents are aware that UV increases the risk of eye damage. The study suggests one in ten didn’t know that eyes are up to 10 times more sensitive to UV damage than skin.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) , UV damage is the most preventable factor of developing cataracts. Exposure to the sun’s UV rays also increases your risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) – the UK’s leading cause of blindness.

In past days many opted not to pay extra for UV protection when buying prescription glasses for themselves and their children. Children are particularly susceptible when it comes to UV. Evidence suggests up to 70% more light reaches a child’s retina than an adult’s and that 80% of a person’s lifetime exposure to UV eye damage happens before the age of 18.

Robert MacLaren at Professor of Ophthalmology, Oxford University comments: “Ultraviolet rays are absorbed at the front of the eye and can cause damage to the surface of the eye leading to irritation and redness. This damage may become permanent after years of exposure to ultra violet light – leading to cataracts or age related macular degeneration. Protection from UV in your everyday glasses gives you the best opportunity to avoid eye health issues in the future. It’s encouraging to see this initiative to improve eye health and I hope other opticians will follow suit.”

Do you have UV protection in your glasses? Please share in the comments box below!


Sunglasses Day – Help New Eyes for the Needy support people on low incomes who have eye problems in the USA and developing nations.


New Eyes for the Needy
New Eyes for the Needy
Tomorrow my calendar told me this morning is Sunglasses Day.

No I’d never heard of it either. But on checking out the various web sites of “New Eyes for the Needy ” I discover it is one of those brilliant ideas which pretty much all of us can help support.

Without going into horrendous detail New Eyes for the Needy “accepts plastic eyeglasses, reading glasses and sunglasses in good condition; metal eyeglasses in any condition; pairs of prescription lenses. U.S. shipping address is supplied. Eyeglasses in good condition are sent to medical missions and international charitable organizations for distribution to the poor in developing nations, like Bolivia, China, Ghana, Honduras, Jamaica, Panama, Philippines and Thailand. They also accept unwanted watches, silver and gold jewelry; costume jewelry; silverware and giftware; dentures with gold inlays and hearing aids. The proceeds from the sale of these items are used to purchase new eyeglasses for poor U.S. residents.”

What is there not to like?

You can donate your old spectacles here.

Thanks in advance.

By the way if you do wear glasses it would be great if you could take part in our recent poll.