Reduce your cancer risk – check out these top tips

I hate cancer
I hate cancer

There are no proven ways to prevent cancer, but you can reduce your risk of getting it.

According to Cancer Research UK, 4 in 10 cancer cases can be prevented, largely through lifestyle changes. It will help to lower your risk of cancer if you:

Eat a healthy, balanced diet

Stories about various foods and diets linked to preventing cancer are often in the news. This is because a lot of research is going on into diet and cancer. However, it isn’t easy to study the link between diet and cancer, because there are so many different factors involved, and cancer can take years to develop.

No single food or supplement can prevent cancer from developing. Overall, research shows a link between eating certain groups of foods (rather than any specific foods, vitamins or nutrients) and a reduction in cancer risk.

Eating a healthy, balanced diet may lower your risk of developing cancer. Try to consume a diet containing:

at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day

plenty of bread, rice, potatoes, pasta and other starchy foods: choose wholegrain foods where possible, as these contain more fibre

some meat, fish, eggs, beans and other non-dairy sources of protein

some milk and dairy foods

just a small amount of foods and drinks high in fat or sugars, such as cakes, crisps and biscuits

Eating a healthy, balanced diet will help your body get all the nutrients it needs.

Fibre and cancer

Evidence consistently suggests that eating plenty of fibre can reduce the risk of bowel cancer. Diets high in fibre can help keep your bowel healthy and prevent constipation.

Fibre-rich foods include wholegrain pasta, bread, breakfast cereals and rice. Pulses, fruit and vegetables are also good sources of fibre.

Red and processed meat

Meat is a good source of protein, vitamins and minerals, such as iron and zinc. However, evidence shows there is probably a link between eating red and processed meat, and the risk of bowel cancer. People who eat a lot of these meats have a higher risk of getting bowel cancer than people who eat small amounts.

Beef, pork and lamb are all red meat. Processed meats include bacon, sausages, salami and ham.

If you eat more than 90 grams of red or processed meat a day (the equivalent of about three thin-cut slices of roast beef, lamb or pork, where each slice is about the size of half a piece of sliced bread), it is recommended that you cut down to 70 grams.

Read more about eating red and processed meat.

Beta-carotene supplements

Beta-carotene, often found in antioxidant supplements, has been found to increase the risk of lung cancer developing in smokers and people who have been heavily exposed to asbestos at work. It is possible that taking large amounts of beta-carotene supplements would also increase the risk of cancer in other people.

Maintain a healthy weight

In England, over 60% of the population is overweight or obese. Being overweight or obese can increase your risk of some cancers, such as:

bowel cancer

pancreatic cancer

oesophageal cancer

breast cancer if you are a woman who has been through the menopause

cancer of the womb (uterus)

kidney cancer

Being a healthy weight can reduce your risk of developing cancer. You can find out whether you are a healthy weight by using the BMI healthy weight calculator.

You can also find information and tips on how to start losing weight.

Stay physically active

There’s evidence that being physically active can reduce your risk of bowel and breast cancer, and also endometrial cancer (cancer of the lining of the uterus). It’s not known exactly how physical activity reduces the risk of these cancers, but research shows that regular exercise helps to keep your hormone levels healthy. Having high levels of some hormones can increase your cancer risk.

Physical activity also helps you to maintain a healthy weight, which in turn reduces the risk of cancer.

See physical activity guidelines for adults.

Drink less alcohol

Drinking alcohol is known to increase your risk of some cancers, including:

mouth cancer

pharynx and larynx cancer

oesophageal cancer

colorectal cancer in men (cancer of the colon or rectum)

breast cancer

It is probably a cause of other cancers as well, such as colorectal cancer in women and liver cancer.

To reduce the risk of harming your health if you drink most weeks:

men and women are advised not to regularly drink more than 14 units a week

spread your drinking over three days or more if you drink as much as 14 units a week.

Use the drinks checker to find out how many units are in different alcoholic drinks.

Stop smoking

Lung cancer is responsible for around a quarter of cancer deaths in the UK, and 90% of lung cancer cases are related to smoking.

“Stopping smoking greatly cuts the risk of developing cancer,” says Hazel Nunn, Cancer Research UK’s health information officer. “The earlier you stop, the greater the impact. But it’s never too late to quit. People who quit smoking at 30 live nearly as long as non-smokers, and those who quit at 50 can still undo half the damage.”

There is support to help you stop smoking.

Protect your skin from sun damage

Taking care in the sun so that you don’t get burned is important for preventing skin cancer. Follow Cancer Research UK’s SunSmart plan to protect yourself:

Spend time in the shade between 11am and 3pm.

Make sure you never burn.

Cover yourself up with a T-shirt, hat and sunglasses.

Take care not to let children get burned.

Use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15.

Keep an eye on any moles or freckles you have. If they change at all (for example, get bigger or begin bleeding), see your GP, as this can be an early sign of cancer. The earlier skin cancer is caught, the easier it is to treat, so see your GP as soon as possible.

We need sunlight on our skin so that our bodies can produce vitamin D, which is essential for healthy bones. Read about sunlight and vitamin D to find out how much sunlight you need.

Know your body

It’s important to know your body and recognise any potential symptoms of cancer, such as lumps or unexplained bleeding, and to get advice about whether they might be serious.

The Energy Diet – Top Tips for Feeling Great Through Diet

The Energy Diet
The Energy Diet

The best way to eat if you want to banish tiredness is to have a healthy, balanced diet that contains foods from the four main food groups in the right proportions.

The four food groups are:

fruit and vegetables

potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy foods

milk and dairy foods

beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other non-dairy sources of protein

Eat at regular intervals

If you eat at regular times, your body knows when your next meal is coming and learns to manage feelings of hunger and sustain your energy levels.

Try to eat three meals a day and limit snacks – especially high-fat ones – between meals.

Breakfast boosts your energy

Breakfast gives you the energy you need to face the day. Despite this, up to one-third of us regularly skip breakfast, according to the British Dietetic Association (BDA).

Go for healthier options, such as porridge with fruit, vegetable omelette, or wholemeal toast with a scraping of low-fat spread or jam.

If you can’t face eating as soon as you get up, take a high-fibre snack to eat on the run, rather than snacking on high-sugar or high-fat foods.

Here are five healthy breakfasts, plus how to choose healthy breakfast cereals.

Aim for at least 5 A DAY for more vitality

Most people in the UK eat too much fat, sugar and salt, and not enough fruit and vegetables.

Fruit and vegetables are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre – essential nutrients that your body needs to work properly.

Try to incorporate at least five portions of a variety of fruit and veg into your daily diet. They can be fresh, frozen, tinned, dried or juiced.

Find tips on how to boost your fruit and veg intake.

Read more about how to get your 5 A DAY.

Slow-burning starches give sustained energy

Starchy foods – also called carbohydrates – such as potatoes, bread, cereals and pasta are an important part of a healthy diet. They’re a good source of energy and the main source of a range of nutrients.

Starchy foods should make up just over a third of everything you eat. There are different types of starch. Where possible, go for slow-burning wholegrain or wholemeal varieties, as they release energy gradually.

Read more about healthy starchy foods.

Sugar steals your stamina

Adults and children in the UK eat too much sugar. Sugar is not only bad for your teeth, it can also be bad for your waistline. It gives you a rush of energy, but one that wears off quickly.

Cutting out all sugar is virtually impossible. There are natural sugars in lots of foods, including fruit and veg, and you don’t need to avoid these.

However, it’s a good idea to cut down on foods with lots of added sugar, such as sweets, cakes, biscuits, non-diet fizzy drinks and chocolates.

Read the facts about sugar.

Iron-rich foods prevent fatigue

Four in 10 (40%) girls and women aged 16-24 and almost half (44%) of girls aged 11-15 have low iron stores, according to the National Diet and Nutrition Survey.

Being low on iron can make you feel tired and faint, and look pale.

While red meats, green vegetables and fortified foods such as breakfast cereals are good sources of iron, the important thing is to eat a range of foods to get enough iron.

Here’s more advice on good sources of iron.

Non-alcoholic drinks boost zest levels

Watch your alcohol intake. It can dehydrate you, which will make you feel tired.

Make sure you stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids – the government recommends 6-8 glasses every day. This is in addition to the fluid we get from the food we eat. All non-alcoholic drinks count, but water and lower-fat milk are healthier choices.

Read more about healthy drinks.

Eat enough to pack a punch

Make sure you eat the right amount for your activity level. The average man needs around 2,500 calories a day, and the average woman needs 2,000 calories. Remember, we all overestimate how active we are.

Learn how to understand calories.

Self-help tips to fight fatigue

Self-help tips to fight fatiguee
Self-help tips to fight fatigue
Many cases of unexplained tiredness are due to stress, not enough sleep, poor diet and other lifestyle factors. Use these self-help tips to restore your energy levels.

Eat often to beat tiredness

A good way to keep up your energy through the day is to eat regular meals and healthy snacks every three to four hours, rather than a large meal less often.

Read more about healthy eating.

Perk up with exercise

You might feel too tired to exercise, but regular exercise will make you feel less tired in the long run, and you’ll have more energy. Even a single 15-minute walk can give you an energy boost, and the benefits increase with more frequent physical activity.

Start with a small amount of exercise. Build up your physical activity gradually over weeks and months until you reach the recommended goal of two-and-a-half hours of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, such as cycling or fast walking, every week.

Read more about starting exercise.

Find out the physical activity guidelines for adults.

Lose weight to gain energy

If your body is carrying excess weight, it can be exhausting. It also puts extra strain on your heart, which can make you tired. Lose weight and you’ll feel much more energetic. Apart from eating healthily, the best way to lose weight is to be more active and do more exercise.

Read more about how to lose weight.

Sleep well

It sounds obvious, but two-thirds of us suffer from sleep problems, and many people don’t get the sleep they need to stay alert through the day. The Royal College of Psychiatrists advises going to bed and getting up in the morning at the same time every day; avoid naps through the day, and have a hot bath before bed (as hot as you can bear without scalding you) for at least 20 minutes.

Read more about how to get a good night’s sleep.

Try these NHS-approved sleep apps to help you sleep well.

Reduce stress to boost energy

Stress uses up a lot of energy. Try to introduce relaxing activities into your day. This could be working out at the gym, or a gentler option, such as listening to music, reading or spending time with friends. Whatever relaxes you will improve your energy.

Read more about how to relieve stress.

Talking therapy beats fatigue

There’s some evidence that talking therapies such as counselling or cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) might help to fight fatigue. See your GP for a referral for talking treatment on the NHS or for advice on seeing a private therapist.

Read more about counselling.

Cut out caffeine

The Royal College of Psychiatrists recommends that anyone feeling tired should cut out caffeine. It says the best way to do this is to gradually stop having all caffeine drinks (this includes coffee, tea and cola drinks) over a three-week period. Try to stay off caffeine completely for a month to see if you feel less tired without it.

You may find that not consuming caffeine gives you headaches. If this happens, cut down more slowly on the amount of caffeine that you drink.

Drink less alcohol

Although a few glasses of wine in the evening helps you fall asleep, you sleep less deeply after drinking alcohol. The next day you’ll be tired, even if you sleep a full eight hours.

Cut down on alcohol before bedtime. You’ll get a better night’s rest and have more energy. The NHS recommends that men and women should not regularly drink more than 14 units a week, which is equivalent to six pints of average strength beer or 10 small glasses of low strength wine.

Read more about how to cut down on alcohol.

Drink more water for better energy

Sometimes you feel tired simply because you’re mildly dehydrated. A glass of water will do the trick, especially after exercise.

Read about healthy drinks.

7 Tips to Get Fit When You’re a Student

7 Great Fitness Tips
7 Great Fitness Tips

Getting fit when you’re in college can be quite challenging for most students, particularly if you’re a freshman. Until now, you’ve lived with your parents who took care of you, advised about diet, physical activities and encouraged you to be fitter. It’s easy to “fall off the track” once you go away and live on your own. You get caught up in classes and exciting student life. Fitness isn’t on the list of priorities anymore. But at the same time, you still want to look your best. Is there any way a college student can balance everything? There are many things you can do to get fit and avoid feeling your life revolves around classes and exercises. Scroll down to see different things you can do to stay in shape.

  1. Have a routine

 Although routines are, safe to say, boring in other aspects of our lives, it’s paramount for your fitness. That’s why establishing your own routine is the first and the most powerful thing you can do on your way to get fit or stay in shape.

When it comes to exercise, most of us usually wonder when is the best time of the day to work out. If you browse this topic on Google, you’ll get hundreds of results. Some say the best workout time is in the morning; others claim it’s in the afternoon, and so on. However, sticking with a workout routine is more important than the time of the day you exercise.

Consider your schedule at college or job, in case you work, and determine the exact time of the day when you can spare a few minutes to exercise. Then, make sure you do it every day during that period. You can create a schedule of different activities to do during that time of the day e.g. today jog, strength exercises tomorrow and so on. Doing different types of exercises will target different muscle groups and help you get in shape faster.

  1. Stay hydrated

 It’s confession time, how many glasses of water you drink on a daily basis? Your answer probably shows you don’t drink enough water to keep your body hydrated and energized. The truth is, you’re not alone. Most people, in general, don’t drink enough water. And no, drinking all that coffee doesn’t really count.

Staying hydrated throughout the day and during your workouts is essential. In fact, lack of hydration has a negative impact on your performance. How? It’s because you get tired more quickly. Also, water intake poses as one of the most efficient ways to get fit, stay in shape, and avoid weight gain. For example, the study published in the Annals of Family Medicine showed that people who don’t drink enough water had increased chances of becoming obese.

Take a bottle of water wherever you go and make sure you sip on it when you’re studying or working on your assignments. Don’t wait to feel the thirst first because the dehydration signs already start to appear in the form of fatigue or sleepiness. Since it’s very easy to forget to drink water throughout the day, you can always download an app which will remind you to do so. There are many of them available for Android and iOS devices.

  1. What’s your goal?

 If you don’t have a fitness goal, then you probably won’t stick to the schedule. Goals pose as some sort of commitment; we want to accomplish them, and feel like winners. Who doesn’t want that? Lack of targets also means there’s no motivation, or direction that shows which way you’ll go.

Besides establishing a routine, you should also take a few moments to think about goals you’d like to accomplish. It can be just about anything; weight loss, more endurance, more flexibility, being able to do a certain number of reps in a particular period of time, etc.

Divide your goals into smaller milestones that are easy to accomplish. This will boost your motivation to stick with your schedule and get fit as soon as possible.

  1. Take a walk

 Don’t like going to the gym? Not a fan of complicated exercises? Finding it difficult to motivate yourself to exercise properly? Yes, we’ve all been there! Until you get motivated to do something specific, you can just walk. That’s the easiest (and the cheapest) way of staying in shape.

Make sure you take a walk around your campus, or a block, after all, big meals. Walking after a meal helps you maintain your weight at a healthy range. Also, instead of driving a car, taking a bus, using elevators, opt to walk instead or ride a bike.

  1. Pay attention to your diet

 Physical activity means nothing if your diet consists of pizzas, doughnuts, French fries, and other unhealthy foods. Regardless of how delicious they are, it’s important to pay attention to your nutrition and opt for healthier meals.

Food is fuel for your body; it provides energy which is why things you eat should have great nutritional value. Typical student food, or entire Western diet for that matter, is quite unhealthy and doesn’t supply our body with healthy nutrients it needs to function properly. Besides fitness, the unhealthy diet also affects your health, productivity and so on.

Does this mean you should follow some strict diet program? No, not at all. In fact, the best diet plan for every college student should be:

  • Eat regularly, don’t skip meals
  • Opt for healthier alternatives to favorite meals
  • Reduce portion size
  • Eat plenty of calcium-rich foods
  • Limit sugar intake
  • Read labels to see nutrient content, whether there are any suspicious ingredients etc.
  • Include variety of fruits and vegetables in your diet
  • Instead of chips and fries, opt for carrot sticks as your snack of choice
  1. Get a buddy

 Yet another practical and useful way to stick to your routine is to exercise with someone. You can work out with your friend, colleague, or even set up a club where all students can meet and exercise together. Why is this important? It’s because when you have a commitment and opt to work out with someone, you are more likely to achieve the goals you set.

In fact, a study published in the Psychology of Sport and Exercise revealed that the workout habits of people you know have a positive influence on your own habits. Therefore, buddy up to become fit!

  1. Have sex

 Sex is yet another way you can get fit more easily, but when you pair it with the regular physical activity of course. The Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality published a study which showed that physical activity and sex life are correlated. Those who exercised more also reported feeling more desirable as well as improved performance. Also, it’s a well-known fact that sex can help you burn calories.

No, this doesn’t mean you should hop from one bed into another because let’s face it, that would bring you more harm than good. Instead, you should work on your endurance in bed. One way of doing that is to build your momentum, do cardio, and try performing Kegel exercises for men, which are very easy to do.

These exercises improve your bladder control, address premature ejaculation which is a major problem for college students who are still trying to work on their performance, and improve your sex life in general. To do these exercises you just have to tighten pelvic floor muscles, contract them, and release after a few seconds. You can do Kegel exercises just about anywhere at any time.

 

Conclusion

Staying in shape or getting fit in college isn’t the easiest task in the world. You feel lazy and aren’t sure how to fit gym trips into your busy schedule. This article showed you how to get into perfect shape without going to the gym (unless you want to) or struggling to do some vigorous activities. All you need is to set up a strategy that works for you and stick to your routine. Good luck!

 

Video:-Functional Fitness: Learn Fitness Functional Exercises from Dr. Adam Friedman


Via:-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eadXMR7hNJ4

 

Author Bio:-
Annie Lizstan works as a health and beauty consultant for online websites and an independent researcher by profession.  She always like to explore her ideas about health, fitness and  beauty . In her recent period ,she got an opportunity to explore  on anti-aging product like Instaflex. You can also connect with her on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

Foods to beat bad moods

Okay I’m a sucker for this kind of thing. What you eat can really impact how you feel.

But this infographic maybe going a bit far

Have any of my readers experienced this kind of thing?

Foods to Beat the Bad Mood!

From Visually