Polluted Air is a Possible Cause of Dementia

Polluted Air is a Possible Cause of Dementia
Polluted Air is a Possible Cause of Dementia

There are over 850,000 people in the UK with dementia and this figure is expected to increase to over 1 million in 2025 and by 2050, it will rise to more than 2 million according to the Alzheimer’s Society. Dementia is a degenerative disease causing a decline in cognitive and mental functioning. There are many causes of dementia including head injuries, stroke or brain tumour.

Several research studies have been undertaken to better understand the causes of this condition as well as its early signs. Lately, recent evidence came to light that dementia may be linked to dirty air. Based on research findings, contaminated air can be a possible source of dementia. It is believed that high concentrations of magnetite particles found in polluted air may be linked to dementia. Researchers are trying to establish whether there is a definitive relation between magnetite found in the brains of Alzheimer patients and the onset of dementia.

Memory loss – should you be worried?

Memory loss
Memory loss

Introduction

Memory loss, also called amnesia, happens when a person loses the ability to remember information and events they would normally be able to recall.

It could be something that happened seconds or minutes ago, or a memorable event that occurred in the past. The loss of memory may have started suddenly, or it may have been getting worse over the last year or so.

It’s normal to become a bit forgetful as you get older. However, memory loss could be a symptom of something more serious and should be checked by a GP.

Memory loss can be distressing for the person affected, and their family. Relatives may fear the worst and assume it’s caused by dementia, but this often isn’t the case.

The following information will tell you:

what to do if you’re worried about memory loss

how to tell if it could be caused by dementia

the most common causes of memory loss (but don’t rely on this to self-diagnose a condition)

how to cope with a poor memory

What to do if you’re worried about memory loss


See your GP if you’re worried because you or someone you care for has lost their memory. They’ll do an initial assessment and ask questions about symptoms, family history and lifestyle. They may also arrange a blood test.

Memory loss has a wide range of possible causes, depending on the type of memory loss.

Doctors classify memories as either:

immediate memories – such as sounds, which are only stored for a few seconds

short-term or recent memories – such as telephone numbers, which stay in your memory for 15 to 20 seconds; the brain can store about seven chunks of short-term information at any time

long-term or remote memories – more permanent memories, which have been reinforced because you’ve repeatedly gone over them in your mind

If your GP thinks you or your relative needs an assessment for dementia, or that there may be another more serious underlying condition, such as brain damage, they’ll refer you to a specialist.

Could memory loss be dementia?

If you’re reading this because you think your memory problems may be a sign of dementia, rest assured that they probably aren’t. A person with dementia won’t usually be aware of their memory loss, or may deny it.

Your memory loss is likely to be caused by something much more common and treatable, such as depression.

You may be worried that someone you care for has dementia. However, bear in mind around 40% of people over 65 have some type of memory problem, and only 15% will develop dementia each year.

If your instincts are correct, their denial or lack of awareness of their memory loss can make it difficult to convince them to see a GP. This fact sheet includes information about how to persuade your relative to see a doctor (PDF, 848kb).

Signs that someone has dementia

As a general guide:

Dementia usually occurs in people over the age of 65.

The memory loss doesn’t happen suddenly, but gets gradually worse over time.

Someone with dementia will struggle to remember immediate or recent events, but can still recall events that happened a long time ago. This means that if their long-term memory is affected, it probably isn’t dementia.

Read more about the symptoms of dementia.

Common causes of memory loss

GPs often find that people who see them about memory loss are most likely to have:

anxiety

stress

depression

Their memory loss is a result of poor concentration and not noticing things in the first place because of a lack of interest. Sleeping problems often make the memory loss worse.

Your GP may suggest trying antidepressants. If you have depression or anxiety, your memory problems should get better as the depression or anxiety improves.

An elderly person with memory loss is likely to have depression if they also experience changes in behaviour, such as hoarding or being bad tempered.

Other common causes of memory loss are:

a head injury – for example, after a car accident

stroke – this cuts off some of the blood supply to the brain and causes brain tissue to die

These will cause sudden memory loss, where you either forget events that happened before the trauma (retrograde amnesia), or you forget everything that happened after the trauma (anterograde amnesia).

Less common causes of memory loss

Less commonly, memory loss can be caused by:

an underactive thyroid – where your thyroid gland (found in the neck) doesn’t produce enough hormones

certain types of medication, such as sedatives and some treatments for Parkinson’s disease

long-term alcohol misuse

bleeding in the brain (subarachnoid haemorrhage)

vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency – for example, as the result of a digestive problem

transient global amnesia – problems with blood flow to part of the brain, which causes sudden episodes of memory loss that a person can’t recall afterwards

psychogenic amnesia – a stressful or traumatic event that causes someone to block out the memory, leaving them unable to remember important information

a brain tumour

Click on the links above for more information about these conditions.

Tips for coping with a poor memory

Keep everyday items, such as car keys, in the same place and try to do things in the same order each time.

Write information down, and keep paper and a pencil near the phone.

Keep a diary at home as well as at work to remind you to do daily tasks.

Use an alarm to help you remember to do something in the future, such as taking something out of the oven.

Repeat important information you need to remember back to someone.

What are the health benefits of walking?

So what are the health benefits of walking?

According to this fascinating infographic it can help with diabetes, dementia , arthritis, heart disease and depression.

I try to walk for a couple of hours a day so makes me happy!

Health Benefits of Walking

From

Can High Blood Pressure Affect Your Brain Health?

Can High Blood Pressure Affect Your Brain Health?
Can High Blood Pressure Affect Your Brain Health?

High blood pressure is very common among adults. The blood pressure measured above 120/80 mmHg is considered to be higher than normal blood pressure. The statistics released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that 1 in 3 adults in the United States have high blood pressure. High blood pressure usually doesn’t have symptoms. However, sometimes the people with high blood pressure may experience headache, blurred vision, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

If high blood pressure usually doesn’t have symptoms, then what should you do? I guess I don’t have to tell you about it. You need to get your blood pressure checked every now and then. There are people who just ignore their high blood pressure, and due to their carelessness, it leads them to various diseases, which are caused by uncontrolled blood pressure. If you have high blood pressure, then you should better get it under control. In this article, you will get to know about how high blood pressure can affect your brain health.

How high blood pressure can have an adverse impact on your brain health?

It is very crucial to control your blood pressure to reduce the chance of suffering from brain diseases. There are many things, which can lead to high blood pressure like smoking, stress, overweight, salty foods, and others. You should modify your lifestyle to minimize the chances of having blood pressure. When you minimize your chances of having high blood pressure, you automatically minimize the chances of suffering from brain diseases as well.

Some of the brain diseases are dementia, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and others. The statistics show that 5.4 million Americans are diagnosed with Alzheimer and 1 million Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Moreover, the numbers are expected to further increase in the upcoming years. With the high prevalence of brain diseases, it is necessary to take good care of your brain health. In addition to controlling your blood pressure, you should also consume best brain foods for improving your brain health.

Your brain needs sufficient blood supply to function properly. High blood pressure could cause severe damage to your brain if it is not controlled. Here are the ways how high blood pressure can affect your brain health.

Transient ischemic attack (TIA): TIA is also called mini stroke. It is simply a temporary obstruction of blood supply to your brain. The root cause of TIA is high blood pressure. TIA is generally caused because of a blood clot or atherosclerosis, which are caused because of high blood pressure.

Damages and weakens your brain’s blood vessels: Uncontrolled blood pressure will damage and weakens the blood vessels in your brain. This will further lead in narrowing, rupturing, or leakage. When this happens, you are likely to suffer from stroke. Moreover, uncontrolled blood pressure will also form a blood clot in your arteries, which blocks the blood from getting to the brain, which will lead to stroke.

Dementia: Dementia is simply a brain disease, which causes thinking, reasoning, memory, and other problems related to functions of the brain. There are various causes of dementia, and one of the causes is high blood pressure. As high blood pressure results in obstruction in arteries, which is responsible for providing blood to the brain, it causes vascular dementia.

Mild Cognitive Impairment: You need a good memory to smoothly carry out your day to day activities. However, with cognitive impairment, you will not be able to smoothly carry out your day to day operation. Mild cognitive impairment may be caused due to aging, diabetes, smoking, and high blood pressure. The obstruction of blood flow to your brain caused because of high blood pressure does not allow your brain to function properly, which may lead to mild cognitive impairment. You can try some of the top brain supplements like Geniux to improve your memory.

Conclusion

You are now well aware about the risks of not controlling your blood pressure. It is absolutely critical to control your blood pressure to improve your overall health. Your brain is a central processing unit of your body, and you don’t want to be careless regarding your brain health. You should seek for every possible way to improve your brain health; however, the first step is to control your blood pressure. You can also try some of the top memory aids for improving your memory.

I hope you will modify your lifestyle after reading this article. You can modify your diet, and do some physical workouts enhance your overall health. The study shows that exercises can also enhance your overall brain health. You don’t need to panic; you just need to take necessary actions to improve your health and lifestyle.

Author Bio:
Annie Lizstan works as a health and beauty consultant for online websites and an independent researcher by profession. She had completed her studies from university of Arizona and lives in Wasilla, Alaska.  She has experience researching as a passion as well as profession. You can also connect with her on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

Ten Signs of Alzheimer’s – What you Need to Know!

The thought of Alzheimer’s is very concerning. Especially when it affects family and friends!

But the earlier Alzheimer’s (and other forms of dementia) are diagnosed the better the treatments available.

So we are sharing this list of signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease from the Alzheimer’s Association.

Know the 10 signs – An infographic by the team at Alzheimer’s Association