Zika Virus Disease: 8 things you need to know right away

Zika Virus Disease: 8 things you need to know right away

Zika Virus Disease: 8 things you need to know right away

From Visually.

Autism , Learning Challenges and General Health

Over the last few months a long of pixels have been spilled over the whole issue of autism and general health.

We know about the realtionship between autism, anxiety and epilepsy for example.

But this inforgraphic suggests a whole range of issues involving the whole of the learning disabilities such as Downs Syndrome.

What do you think?

What not share in the comment box!

Learning Disability Health Matters

From Visually.

Iron Deficiency Anemia – Infographic

Some of you may remember that a few years back we covered the area of iron deficiency in some detail. I even put together a recipe for an iron rich pesto which was (and is) actually edible.

So I was very please to locate this excellent infographic which gives a great overview of iron deficiency anemia. Or Iron deficiency anaemia as we call it in the UK!


Iron Deficiency Anemia - Infographic

Source: Medindia

Iron deficiency anaemia is a condition where a lack of iron in the body leads to a reduction in the number of red blood cells.

Iron is used to produce red blood cells, which help store and carry oxygen in the blood. If you have fewer red blood cells than is normal, your organs and tissues won’t get as much oxygen as they usually would.

There are several different types of anaemia, and each one has a different cause. Iron deficiency anaemia is the most common type.

Other types of anaemia can be caused by a lack of vitamin B12 or folate in the body – read more about vitamin B12 and folate deficiency anaemia.

Symptoms of iron deficiency anaemia

Many people with iron deficiency anaemia only have a few symptoms. The severity of the symptoms largely depends on how quickly anaemia develops.

You may notice symptoms immediately, or they may develop gradually if your anaemia is caused by a long-term problem, such as a stomach ulcer.

The most common symptoms include:

tiredness and lack of energy (lethargy)

shortness of breath

noticeable heartbeats (heart palpitations)

a pale complexion

Less common symptoms include:

headache

hearing sounds that come from inside the body, rather than from an outside source (tinnitus)

an altered sense of taste

feeling itchy

a sore or abnormally smooth tongue

hair loss

a desire to eat non-food items, such as ice, paper or clay (pica)

difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)

painful open sores (ulcers) on the corners of your mouth

spoon-shaped nails

When to see your GP

See your GP if you experience symptoms of iron deficiency anaemia. They should be able to diagnose the condition using a simple blood test.

Read more about diagnosing iron deficiency anaemia.

What causes iron deficiency anaemia?

There are many things that can lead to a lack of iron in the body. In men and post-menopausal women, the most common cause is bleeding in the stomach and intestines.

In women of reproductive age, heavy periods and pregnancy are the most common causes of iron deficiency anaemia as your body needs extra iron for your baby during pregnancy.

Unless you’re pregnant, it’s rare for iron deficiency anaemia to be caused just by a lack of iron in your diet. However, if you do lack dietary iron, it may mean you’re more likely to develop anaemia than if you have one of the problems mentioned above.

Read more about the causes of iron deficiency anaemia.

How iron deficiency anaemia is treated

Treatment for iron deficiency anaemia involves taking iron supplements to boost the low levels of iron in your body. This is usually effective, and the condition rarely causes long-term problems.

You’ll need to be monitored every few months to check the treatment is working and your iron levels have returned to normal.

The underlying cause will need to be treated so you don’t get anaemia again. Increasing the amount of iron in your diet may also be recommended.

Good sources of iron include:

dark-green leafy vegetables, such as watercress and curly kale

iron-fortified cereals or bread

brown rice

pulses and beans

nuts and seeds

meat, fish and tofu

eggs

dried fruit, such as dried apricots, prunes and raisins

Read more about treating iron deficiency anaemia.

Further problems

If iron deficiency anaemia is left untreated, it can make you more susceptible to illness and infection, as a lack of iron affects the body’s natural defence system (the immune system).

Severe iron deficiency anaemia may increase your risk of developing complications that affect the heart or lungs, such as an abnormally fast heartbeat (tachycardia) or heart failure, where your heart is unable to pump enough blood around your body at the right pressure.

Pregnant women with severe or untreated anaemia also have a higher risk of complications before and after birth.

Read more about the complications of iron deficiency anaemia.

Are you a parent of a child with autism and have 15 minutes to spare? Please help the Karolinska Institutet with a survey

Karolinska Institutet - Autism Research
Karolinska Institutet – Autism Research
Earlier this week we were contacted by one of our readers who asked us to help find people to take a survey. Suzanne Axelsson, herself a mother with a  child on the spectrum told us “My husband is starting up some research into the sleep routines of children with autism. Sleep is an essential part of learning… and also social interaction… if we are tired it is harder to react appropriately to a given situation… and as I see with my own son, who has autism, he is depleted of his energy reserves sometimes rapidly by things that would hardly bother others… this means that good sleep hygiene is even more essential for my son”.
Her husband John Axelsson of the Karolinska Institutet , a leading medical university in Sweden, shared:
“Karolinska Institutet is currently conducting a study to explore the complex relation between autistic traits and sleep quality. 
While we know that sleep is often affected in this group, the underlying mechanisms remains largely unknown. 
If you have a child that has been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder or have autistic traits, you can contribute to this research by filling out a questionnaire about your child and his/her sleep, taking approximately 15 minutes. You will not be asked to provide any identifying information such as name or date of birth, meaning that your answers will remain strictly anonymous and confidential. The data will be used for developing better interventions to improve sleep quality and day time functioning in children with autism. 
 
Simply click on this link to participate (https://survey.ki.se/Survey/4695/en) but please make sure that you have 15 minutes to spend as you only can access the questionnaire once. 
Thank you very much for your time, and don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions! 
 
Associate Prof. John Axelsson, 
Dept. Clinical Neuroscience
Karolinska Institutet 

Happy Thanksgiving to all those celebrating

Happy Thanksgiving 2016
Happy Thanksgiving 2016

Patient Talk would like to wish a Happy Thanksgiving to all our readers